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Posted by On Friday, January 30, 2015

A new documentary focuses on college sexual assault, a smartphone app aims to help victim/survivors in Washington D.C. and male victim/survivors struggle to find support.

The Hunting Ground

In 2013 Kirby Dick and Amy Ziering shocked the nation with their documentary Invisible War, which focused on sexual assault in the United States Military. Now, they’re turning their camera on American colleges, with The Hunting Ground, which premiered last week at the Sundance Film Festival. According to The New York Times, “audience members repeatedly gasped as student after student spoke on camera about being sexually assaulted—and being subsequently ignored or run through endless hoops by college administrators concerned about keeping rape statistics low.” Set to be released in theaters and air on CNN, and already receiving attention from powerful politicians, including Barbara Boxer and Kirsten Gillibrand, this documentary seems ready to focus even more much-needed attention on campus sexual assault.

ASK Aids DC Victim/Survivors

Washington D.C. offers some of the most comprehensive support in the country for victim/survivors of sexual assault, including guidance from a professional sexual assault counselor, a free ride to Washington D.C. forensic hospital MedStar Washington, and STD tests and HIV-medication free of charge. None of those resources do much good, however, if victim/survivors don’t know they exist or how to access them. That’s where the app Assault Services Knowledge (UASK, in its university specific form) comes in to play. Developed by the group Men Can Stop Rape in conjunction with District of Columbia Mayor’s Office of Victims Services, ASK makes it simple to access available resources by compiling contact information for all local services. The app has already been downloaded 14,000 times, but the ultimate goal is to get the word out to all of Washington’s 100,000 college students and 650,000 residents.

Male Survivors

In a study of male college students, 1 in 25 reported they had been sexually assaulted in their lifetime. A male advocacy group estimates the rate of victimization is much higher at 1 in 6 males are sexually assaulted before age 18. Despite those figures, even a more-than-casual follower of discussions around campus sexual assault might be forgiven for thinking that male victimization is rare or even non-existent. The vast majority of attention focuses on female victim/survivors. Yet, as this profile of a male victim/survivor at Brown University makes clear, that lack of attention can have serious negative consequences for men who experience sexual violence. Societal expectations about masculinity and stereotypes about male victim/survivors, particularly gay male victim/survivors, can discourage reporting or make it more difficult for those who do report to make their stories heard.

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