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4 Resources to Start Your Campaign Around Sexual Assault Awareness Month
Posted by On Wednesday, April 1, 2015

As many of our readers are no doubt aware, today marks the beginning of Sexual Assault Awareness Month (SAAM). While SAAM is always relevant to those concerned about the safety and well-being of college students, the focus of this year’s campaign is s especially relevant to institutes of higher education: the prevention of sexual violence on college campuses. We know our readers will be looking for creative and engaging ways to participate. Here are some ideas and resources to get you started.

Plan an Event

The National Sexual Violence Resource Center releases planning guides to help advocates and allies develop an effective Sexual Assault Awareness Month campaign. These valuable guides provide specific event ideas and strategies for promoting awareness and engaging your community’s support and participation. Another great resource is this list of specific events on their blog.

Wear Jeans

Denim Day is Wednesday, April 29th this year. Denim Day started as a protest against a ruling by the Italian Supreme Court that overturned a rape conviction because the victim’s jeans were “too tight” for the attacker to remove without the victim’s help. Denim Day was conceived as a protest against all such misconceptions about sexual violence. You can show your support by organizing a full-fledged campaign around Denim Day on your campus or simply wearing jeans on April 29th this year.

Watch a Movie

The Hunting Ground, a new documentary on campus rape, has been raising awareness and provoking important conversations on college and university campuses across the country. Go to a screening to educate yourself or get more people involved by arranging a field trip. Make sure to organize a follow up discussion and make support resources easily available to students and staff who may be triggered by the movie.

Host a Workshop

Our own website offers numerous resources and ideas for workshops and awareness campaigns that you can use to create programming around Sexual Assault Awareness Month. Download free posters, workshops, and other materials here and adapt them to your own campus’s needs.

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“Survivor-Centered”: Interview with Peter Novak [Part 2 of 3]
Posted by On Tuesday, September 30, 2014

In this second excerpt from CampusClarity’s interview with Peter Novak, he discusses the value of clear, coordinated, and survivor-centered policies and reporting procedures in dealing with issues of sexual misconduct on campus, and how the support of survivors is intrinsic to the goals of Title IX.

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A New School Year — Let’s Talk About It
Posted by On Thursday, August 21, 2014

Today we’re publishing a guest post from Jennifer Waryas, the University of San Francisco’s Health Marketing Coordinator. Jennifer brings together different groups and individuals to coordinate USF’s harm-reduction efforts.

Today she is writing about some of the larger strategies she follows to create successful campus programming around sexual violence and substance abuse. She’ll be writing a post about once a month to keep us updated on her efforts, setbacks, and triumphs as the school year rolls on. You can also follow her at the USF Talk About It blog.

A New School Year – Let’s Talk About It

by Jennifer Waryas

And so the 2014-15 academic year begins . . .

In order for sexual violence prevention programs to be successful and win the attention of students, we need to deliver an effective, cohesive, consistent, and positive set of messages around the topics of alcohol, drugs, and sexual misconduct that empower all students to make decisions that ultimately result in a safe, fun, and successful college life experience. At the start of this new school year on the University of San Francisco campus, two big ideas govern our strategy: continuing conversations and coordinated messaging.

(more…)

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Weekly Roundup
Posted by On Friday, August 1, 2014

One of the most important requirements of Title IX, and one that many schools may be scrambling to fulfill, is that any school that receives federal funding must appoint a Title IX coordinator. Today, we want to focus on this requirement, with a few stories about the duties of Title IX coordinators, and some interviews with Title IX compliance officers about what their position requires.

Must-Knows for Title IX Coordinators

This piece, written by Anthony Walesby, current Vice Provost for Academic and Faculty Affairs for the University of Michigan, and former federal investigator for the Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights, outlines the must-knows for Title IX coordinators and the crucial role they play in addressing campus sexual violence. Walesby emphasizes the importance of staying informed about Title IX requirements since a school’s Title IX compliance is ultimately the responsibility of its Title IX coordinator, but he also points out that compliance requires the participation of many campus partners who have other interests and concerns. Therefore, Walesby gives this advice to Title IX coordinators:  “Your work may not always be appreciated or popular with everyone all the time, but in the end, you are doing what is in the best interest of your institution. Always keep that in mind.”

Q&A with Stanford’s New Title IX Coordinator

Much like Walesby, Stanford’s recently appointed dedicated Title IX coordinator, Catherine Criswell, comes to the university after a 19-year career with the Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights, in which she focused largely on Title IX investigations. In this interview, Criswell talks about how that experience will inform her work on the Stanford campus, discusses the importance of creating “lasting culture change around issues of sexual assault and sexual violence,” and lays out some of her plans for her work as Title IX coordinator, including establishing a campus climate survey, as recommended by the White House task force report.  In addition to being a neutral investigator, Criswell sees her role as educating the campus community about Title IX rights and reaching out to students, faculty, and staff to find out more “about the climate around these issues at Stanford and about what they would like to see happen.”

Q&A with Harvard’s New Title IX Coordinator

We’ve reported before on Harvard’s new sexual assault policy, set to go into effect with the start of the coming school year. In this interview Mia Karvonides, Harvard’s Title IX officer (and another former OCR attorney) discusses the challenges of implementing the new policy across multiple Schools, each with their own Title IX coordinators, the process of formulating the new policy, and the resources available to Harvard students who are victim/survivors of sexual violence and harassment. However, as Karvonides points out, Harvard is one community and the new central office she heads – the Office for Sexual and Gender-Based Dispute Resolution – will investigate complaints of sexual misconduct against students and “create a new level of continuity and consistency.”

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Weekly Roundup
Posted by On Friday, July 18, 2014

As anyone reading this blog or following news coverage of campus sexual violence knows all too well, combating college sexual assault is never simple, straightforward, or easy. This week we have four more stories that highlight that fact.

Why Victims and Accused Students Both Think the Campus Judicial System is Inadequate

One thing the accused and accuser seem to agree on is that their campus judicial system is inadequate because it perpetuates, depending on your perspective, either “slut-shaming rape culture” or the “war on men” and their due process.  Many campus administrators find themselves in a catch-22 situation when they use disciplinary proceedings to decide a “he-said-she-said” campus case of sexual assault. However, Title IX leaves administrators little choice but to err on the side of taking steps to protect campus safety even if the accused would not be found guilty “beyond a reasonable doubt” in a court of law.

(more…)

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Free Substance Abuse Prevention Posters
Posted by On Wednesday, July 2, 2014

Not Everyone Binge DrinksHelp prevent substance abuse on your campus with these posters from the design team behind our award-winning online training program Think About It.

These posters raise awareness about the risks of using alcohol and marijuana by addressing widely-held myths about each substance.

“Weed is Not Safe for Everyone” debunks the widespread and false belief that using marijuana is a universally safe and positive experience. This poster highlights statistics regarding the frequency of negative reactions to marijuana consumption, giving students the facts to more accurately assess the consequences of using cannabis.

Similarly, studies have shown that college students consistently overestimate how often and how much their peers drink. “Not Everyone Binge Drinks” counteracts the potentially dangerous perception that “everyone else is doing it” by providing students with the most reliable figures available on the prevalence of on-campus binge drinking.

Download the posters here:

  1. Weed is Not Safe for Everyone
  2. Not Everyone Binge Drinks
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Party Smart 21st Birthday Card
Posted by On Tuesday, June 10, 2014

As part of our continuing effort to help you help students with free downloadable resources on our blog, today we’re publishing a creative resource generously shared with us by the University of San Francisco. USF’s Talk About It 21st Birthday Card is a clever way of raising awareness about safe drinking strategies among students who will be drinking (or at least drinking legally) for the first time. The card, which you can print out from the files below to send to your students, includes tips from the “Party Smart” section of our award-winning online training program Think About It, so that when students celebrate their milestone birthday with its newly gained freedoms (and accompanying responsibilities), they’ll be ready to do so safely and responsibly.

  1. Generic Party Smart 21st Birthday Card PDF
  2. Customizable Party Smart 21st Birthday Card Word Document
  3. Customizable Party Smart 21st Birthday Card Adobe Illustrator File

We’ve included not only a PDF of a generic card, but also a Word document and the original Adobe Illustrator file, so that you can customize the card with your school’s name, school colors, emergency services contact information, and anything else you want to add to this informative and important birthday greeting.

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Free Bystander Workshop
Posted by On Tuesday, April 8, 2014

As part of Sexual Assault Awareness Month, we’re releasing materials and resources that we think can help schools build their prevention programming. Today we’re publishing a workshop on Bystander Intervention. It includes a power point, handout, assessment, and discussion guide.

Download the materials here:

  1. Bystander Intervention PPT TAI
  2. Bystander Intervention Discussion Guide
  3. Bystander Intervention Handout
  4. Bystander Intervention Assessment
  5. Bystander Intervention Assessment Answer Key

In addition to our online courses, which discuss safe and positive options for bystander intervention, we also offer this workshop to help schools conduct live training. Resources like these can play an important role in your ongoing prevention efforts. You can use our reports to identify audiences that might most benefit from further bystander education or you can use the training as part of regular and optional workshops.

According to the Campus SaVE Act’s draft regulations, bystander training plays an important part in any school’s primary prevention programming. As defined in the draft regulations:

The term bystander intervention refers to safe and positive options that may be carried out by an individual or individuals to prevent harm or intervene in situations of potential harm when there is a risk of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking against a person other than the individual. Effective bystander intervention training prepares participants to recognize situations of potential harm, overcome barriers to intervening, identify safe and effective intervention options, and take action.

We will be releasing more materials this month and next. We hope you find them helpful!

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Welcome
Posted by On Wednesday, July 10, 2013

Welcome to the CampusClarity blog.

At CampusClarity, our expert team helps colleges and universities maintain a healthy campus climate and comply with the law. This blog is our newest effort.

In these posts, we will discuss major compliance developments. We will navigate the laws, regulations, and best practices that inform campus policies. We will cover topics ranging from Title IX and the Campus SaVE Act to child-abuse reporting, professional ethics, and harm-reduction strategies.

Enacted in March 2013, the Campus SaVE Act has expanded higher education crime reporting requirements and education programs for students and employees. Now more than ever, schools must improve campus safety and compliance. In a small way, this blog will help.

We welcome your feedback. Help us improve our comprehensive harm-reduction program and make this blog a valuable compliance resource.

Enjoy,
The CampusClarity Team

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