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Webinar: Involving Parents in Sexual Assault Prevention
Posted by On Wednesday, July 22, 2015

We hosted a fantastic webinar today with University of San Francisco’s Dr. Barbara Thomas, Director of Counseling and Psychological Services and Dr. Peter Novak, Vice Provost of Student Life.  Dr. Thomas and Dr. Novak shared insights around engaging parents in sexual assault prevention and alcohol/drug use risk reduction. You can view the whole webinar below.

University of San Francisco aims to engage parents in prevention work from when they first consider USF as an option for their child’s education. This includes talking about sexual assault and on campus education efforts, including Think About It, at admissions events. Dr. Novak and Dr. Thomas also encouraged schools to use their Annual Security Report as a resource at admissions events and when informing parents of the school’s programming. From their experience, common questions that parents want to know include “Is your school under investigation for Title IX violations?”, “What are your prevention programs and are they required?”, and “How many reports of sexual assault do you receive every year?”.  These questions are playing a role in how students and their families make decisions about college, and so it is important to be proactive by having effective programming and transparent communication around sexual assault and alcohol/drug use on their campus.

Resources referenced during the webinar include;

We hope to continue the conversation about and share resources on involving parents in prevention efforts.

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Free Poster on the Campus SaVE Act
Posted by On Wednesday, August 6, 2014

Campus SaVE Act Any effort to eliminate campus sexual violence must involve creating and fostering a campus environment where survivors feel comfortable and confident reporting an incident. Unfortunately, according to the Campus Sexual Assault Study, only 5% of campus sexual assaults were reported to the police or campus security. Many students said that they weren’t sure how to report, didn’t want anyone to find out, or were worried that their complaint wouldn’t be taken seriously.

To create a supportive environment, the first step is to educate students, staff, and faculty about these issues and their respective roles and responsibilities — a fact recognized by recent proposed legislation andthe Campus SaVE Act enacted in 2013. Both require schools to educate students and employees on recognizing, reporting, and preventing sexual violence.

This poster helps promote awareness about the Campus SaVE Act and outlines what faculty, staff, and students need to know to fulfill their role in helping to create a safe campus community.

Download the poster here.

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Free Substance Abuse Prevention Posters
Posted by On Wednesday, July 2, 2014

Not Everyone Binge DrinksHelp prevent substance abuse on your campus with these posters from the design team behind our award-winning online training program Think About It.

These posters raise awareness about the risks of using alcohol and marijuana by addressing widely-held myths about each substance.

“Weed is Not Safe for Everyone” debunks the widespread and false belief that using marijuana is a universally safe and positive experience. This poster highlights statistics regarding the frequency of negative reactions to marijuana consumption, giving students the facts to more accurately assess the consequences of using cannabis.

Similarly, studies have shown that college students consistently overestimate how often and how much their peers drink. “Not Everyone Binge Drinks” counteracts the potentially dangerous perception that “everyone else is doing it” by providing students with the most reliable figures available on the prevalence of on-campus binge drinking.

Download the posters here:

  1. Weed is Not Safe for Everyone
  2. Not Everyone Binge Drinks
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Golden State Auditor Issues Report
Posted by On Tuesday, July 1, 2014
Golden State Auditor Issues Report

What to Look for in Prevention Programs
Posted by On Tuesday, May 20, 2014
What to Look for in Prevention Programs

White House Task Force Tells Victims “You’re Not Alone”
Posted by On Friday, May 2, 2014

This week the Obama administration took unprecedented steps to address the problem of campus sexual violence. The First Report from the White House Task Force to Protect Students From Sexual Assault, titled “Not Alone,” echoes President Obama’s message to victims and survivors:

Perhaps most important, we need to keep saying to anyone out there who has ever been assaulted: you are not alone. We have your back. I’ve got your back.

On the same day the Task Force report came out, the Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights issued a new set of guidelines for Title IX compliance. This week the OCR also released a list of 55 schools that are currently under investigation by the OCR for possible Title IX violations. This sends a strong message to colleges and universities across the country to make their compliance efforts a top priority.

This post will focus on the White House Task Force report. Besides acknowledging areas that require research and further study to determine what works, the Task Force report recommends the following best practices for schools to focus on:

  • Campus Climate Surveys: Developing a comprehensive prevention program is an ongoing process. To determine the unique needs of each campus and to measure a particular program’s success, schools need to gather data on the incidence of sexual assault occurring on their campuses and assess the campus climate among students, faculty, staff, and administrators. The Task Force recommends that schools administer an annual survey in the winter or spring to gather this information and provides guidelines for conducting the surveys. In 2016, the administration will explore legislative or administrative mandates requiring schools to conduct annual campus climate surveys.
  • Prevention programs: Given that evidence on effective campus sexual assault prevention methods is limited, the Centers for Disease Control will solicit research proposals in 2015 to inform sexual violence prevention efforts. Until then, the best practice is for campuses to provide continuing and universal prevention education for all students. Specific training requirements are found in the Campus SaVE Act education program requirements and the OCR’s “Questions and Answers on Title IX and Sexual Violence.”
  • Employee Training: The Task Force emphasizes that the first person a victim talks to should be able to provide a victim with information about available resources and services, how to access confidential support, and how to navigate the school’s disciplinary process. Identifying victim advocates who can provide confidential emergency and ongoing support for victims and survivors is deemed a “key best practice.”
  • Reporting and Confidentiality Policies: The Task Force acknowledges that responding to reports of sexual assault while maintaining a victim’s request for confidentiality is a difficult balancing act. However, it is critical that victims get the support they need and schools adequately respond to the situation. The purpose of the report’s suggested policy language is to make students aware of their options for reporting or making confidential disclosures of sexual violence. The Task Force also promises to provide additional sample language on “several challenging areas” by September 2014.
  • Sexual Misconduct Policies: While a school’s sexual misconduct policies must reflect “the unique aspects of the institution and its student body,” the Task Force provides a checklist of important considerations when drafting policies that effectively address prevention, reporting, and responding to sexual misconduct.

Key elements of the Task Force’s recommended victim-services plan are to either provide comprehensive trauma-informed services on campus or partner with community-based organizations to make crisis intervention services available 24 hours a day. In addition, when reports involve criminal investigations there needs to be communication, cooperation, and coordination among campus security, local law enforcement, and victim support groups to make investigations and adjudications more efficient while supporting the victim’s recovery.

Some schools are experimenting with new ideas for investigating and adjudicating sexual assault cases. The Justice Department’s Office on Violence Against Women will begin assessing different models and identifying promising practices in October 2014. Holding offenders accountable is another area where research is “desperately lacking.” The DOJ is now seeking grant applications under its Campus Assault Perpetrator Treatment Pilot Project to gather information on current campus sanctions for sexual assault perpetrators, and to develop and test sexual offender treatment programs.

Finally, the report announces a new website — www.notalone.gov — which provides data and resources for schools, victims, and survivors. For victims and survivors, the website explains how to file a complaint with the OCR and the DOJ against schools for Title IX violations. For schools, the website explains the reporting requirements of the Clery Act and Title IX in sexual assault cases, and how FERPA applies to those obligations. There is also a school-by-school enforcement map, providing links to resolution agreements and court filings addressing Title IX and Clery Act compliance investigations.

If that wasn’t enough information to process, in future posts we’ll help you understand the OCR’s new guidelines and how to put together a prevention program that addresses both the requirements of the Task Force’s best practices and the OCR’s guidelines.

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Free Posters for Sexual Assault Awareness Month
Posted by On Wednesday, April 16, 2014

SAAM_Posters_Page_2We’re already half-way through April. Hopefully, your workshops and activities centered around Sexual Assault Awareness Month have been successful. If you’re looking for other ways to raise awareness, we’ve put together a few black-and-white posters that you can download here.

They’re simple, but — we think — effective. They encourage students to educate themselves about issues surrounding sexual assault. After all, awareness is not only about giving students information, but motivating them to research the issues for themselves. We want students to become advocates!

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Free Bystander Workshop
Posted by On Tuesday, April 8, 2014

As part of Sexual Assault Awareness Month, we’re releasing materials and resources that we think can help schools build their prevention programming. Today we’re publishing a workshop on Bystander Intervention. It includes a power point, handout, assessment, and discussion guide.

Download the materials here:

  1. Bystander Intervention PPT TAI
  2. Bystander Intervention Discussion Guide
  3. Bystander Intervention Handout
  4. Bystander Intervention Assessment
  5. Bystander Intervention Assessment Answer Key

In addition to our online courses, which discuss safe and positive options for bystander intervention, we also offer this workshop to help schools conduct live training. Resources like these can play an important role in your ongoing prevention efforts. You can use our reports to identify audiences that might most benefit from further bystander education or you can use the training as part of regular and optional workshops.

According to the Campus SaVE Act’s draft regulations, bystander training plays an important part in any school’s primary prevention programming. As defined in the draft regulations:

The term bystander intervention refers to safe and positive options that may be carried out by an individual or individuals to prevent harm or intervene in situations of potential harm when there is a risk of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking against a person other than the individual. Effective bystander intervention training prepares participants to recognize situations of potential harm, overcome barriers to intervening, identify safe and effective intervention options, and take action.

We will be releasing more materials this month and next. We hope you find them helpful!

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What is Your Campus Doing for Sexual Assault Awareness Month?
Posted by On Tuesday, April 1, 2014

April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month. It’s a good time for schools to reflect on and reinvigorate their campus programming around sexual violence.

If your school is still searching for quality resources and workshops, don’t worry, we’re here to help.

This month, we’ll be posting free, downloadable workshop materials and other resources. They will cover topics from consent to bystander intervention. We encourage you to use them.

Look for the first workshop later this week!

In addition, this month we’ll be reporting on the draft regulations for the Campus SaVE Act and the White House Task Force’s report on campus sexual violence. So keep checking in!

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