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intervention

Free Webinar: Preventing Sexual Violence on Campus with Michelle Issadore
Posted by On Thursday, April 23, 2015

Next week, on Wednesday, April 29, we will host our second free webinar. Michelle Issadore, M.Ed., will talk about strategies “Preventing Sexual Violence on Campus.” You can register now to reserve your place.

Issadore is the Executive Director of the School and College Organization for Prevention Educators (SCOPE). She works with schools, colleges, and community organizations nationwide to assess and improve their strategic prevention efforts, as well as research and understand best practice initiatives.

Issadore’s presentation is a timely reminder of the fast approaching July 1st deadline when the Campus SaVE Act regulations take effect. The Campus SaVE Act requires colleges and universities to offer student and employee education programs “to prevent dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking.”  (You can find our full breakdown of the Campus SaVE Act requirements on our blog.) This webinar will helps schools put together their prevention programs for the 2015-2016 academic year. Register for the free webinar now to reserve your place.

For many colleges and universities, implementing prevention programs seems like a daunting task, especially given the complexity of the issues and the need to coordinate and engage various stakeholders. Indeed, one of our takeaways from the NASPA conference this year was the need to bring together different prevention efforts and initiatives on campus. Similarly, last year, the Centers for Disease Control published its brief, “Connecting the Dots,” on the links between different forms of violence in order to help schools “coordinate and integrate responses to violence in a way that recognizes these connections.”

Our discussion next week will help address these pressing concerns for schools considering how to train a diverse audience on a breadth of issues around sexual and gender-based violence. During our 45-minute webinar, Michelle Issadore will answer questions surrounding sexual assault prevention strategies on campus and what institutions can do to overcome challenges associated with implementing widespread initiatives.

Michelle Issadore will specifically address the following questions:

  • What are some ways schools can achieve a community-level approach?
  • How can departments work together to create consistent messaging?
  • What role does compliance now play in prevention programming?

Even if your institution currently has training solutions in place, Michelle’s experience and expertise will prove invaluable to anyone looking to enhance their efforts.

Register for the free webinar now to reserve your place .

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Ten Free Resources on Bystander Intervention
Posted by On Wednesday, October 8, 2014

Bystander Intervention has received a lot of attention from educators and advocates in the last few years. The most recent guidance from the Department of Education about Title IX recommends that schools provide training to students on “strategies and skills for bystanders to intervene to prevent possible sexual violence.” The White House’s first report on campus sexual violence pointed to bystander intervention as a “promising prevention strategy” that schools should be implementing on their campuses.

Fortunately, there are already numerous resources available to schools to begin developing their own bystander training. Alongside the White House’s report, the CDC released a document outlining what’s involved in building a bystander program. It provides a great starting point. Below are some more resources you can use to educate trainers about how to teach bystander intervention as well as videos and other materials you can use in workshops with students.

Dr. Alan Berkowitz — Bystander Intervention

This series of short videos by renowned consultant on social justice issues Alan Berkowitz provides a good resource for staff and faculty who are preparing bystander workshops or materials. Berkowitz tells stories of intervention and the principles they illustrate.

Dr. Mary C. Gentile — Giving Voice to Your Values

Mary Gentile teaches ethical decision-making and values-driven leadership for business schools. Although these topics might seem a far cry from sexual violence, they’re not. Her book and workshops focus on teaching students how to speak up and step in when they see something wrong. At the center of her approach is the idea that most ethics education focuses too much on recognizing ethical dilemmas and debating the nuances of them as opposed to responding to ethical dilemmas. Her book and website are full of resources that could be adapted to bystander training for students, staff, and faculty around issues of sexual violence.

Who Are You — Bystander Intervention Video

This video went viral last year. From a New Zealand multi-media campaign aimed at stopping sexual violence, it illustrates all the different people who could have intervened in one evening to stop a sexual assault. The video could fit well into workshops about sexual violence, consent, and, of course, bystander intervention.

Prevent Connect Wiki

This website includes a 10 minute video on “Engaging Bystanders in Violence Against Women Prevention,” which can be a nice introduction for staff or administrators unfamiliar with the approach. The website also includes a good list of videos you can use to discuss bystander intervention strategies, including several clips from the ABC show “What Would You Do?” that involve bystander action around sexual harassment and potential sexual violence.

White House — It’s On Us Campaign

As part of its effort to curb sexual violence, the White House has started an awareness campaign to promote intervening behaviors. The website includes some good resources, including videos.

NSVRC — Bystander Intervention Resources

“This online resource collection offers advocates and preventionists information and resources on bystander intervention. It includes resources to use with community members, as well as information and research on the effectiveness of bystander intervention.”

MIT — Active Bystanders

A nice site with some advice on effective intervention strategies as well as a few interactive scenarios students or facilitators could use to practice bystander skills.

Step Up!

A comprehensive bystander intervention program, Step Up offers a lot of great free resources to help staff develop bystander programs on their campuses. It offers great guides on developing effective bystander scripts. One of the great things about Step Up is that they broaden intervention beyond sexual violence to include issues like drinking, anger, and academic honesty. It is another valuable resource for students and educators. In particular, check out their library of videos that you can use to facilitate discussions about how to intervene and barriers to intervention.

Dr. David Lisak

David Lisak’s homepage offers some valuable resources on understanding predators and the predatory nature of sexual violence.

Samantha Stendal and Aaron Blanton – “A Needed Response”

Created during the Steubenville rape trial by two University of Oregon students, this short, simple video conveys a powerful message about treating women with respect. The video was honored with a Peabody Award, the first viral video to receive that accolade.

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Think About It for Graduate Students
Posted by On Wednesday, September 10, 2014

grad_welcome

Today we’re announcing the launch of Think About It for graduate students!

We’ve spent the last several months developing this course to address the unique needs and situation of graduate students. Refined and informed through focus groups with graduate students and roundtables with administrators, the course has a clean, professional look that appeals to older students. And at one hour, it’s streamlined while still covering all the important compliance and prevention issues, including consent, sexual assault, intimate partner violence, and stalking.

An image of graduate course interaction sample featuring a silhouette of a man making a statement.The course also covers bystander intervention in great depth. We begin by laying a high-level conceptual foundation for intervention, introducing ideas such as cultural barriers to social action. As the course progresses, we discuss further barriers to intervention (for instance, the ways we rationalize away someone’s bad behavior or our own inaction), model ways to overcome those barriers, and provide practical strategies to intervene. As always, we provide students opportunities to apply these skills in realistic scenarios.

We see all our courses as on-going projects, which evolve and develop as we collect more feedback from users and new research informs best practices. Just as we’re planning on using the latest research-based strategies to further improve our undergraduate course, we’ll be conducting more focus groups and roundtables to provide valuable insight on ways to engage students in our course material. We look forward to working with schools to create a program that helps them initiate meaningful change in a way that addresses these challenges in their campus communities.

To learn more about the course email us at admin@lawroom.com

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Weekly Roundup
Posted by On Friday, August 22, 2014

The fight against campus sexual assault isn’t limited to activists and administrators. This week we have stories about how student bystanders, parents, and faculty are joining the fight against sexual assault.

Male Peers Preventing Sexual Assault

A 2002 study conducted by psychologist David Lisak suggested that a small percentage — 6% — of male college students had committed rape, and two-thirds of those men were repeat offenders. But very few, if any, of those who admitted to predatory behavior considered themselves rapists, even though many of these same students admitted to deliberately getting young women drunk to the point of incapacitation for the explicit purpose of having sex with them.

(more…)

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Small Acts of Kindness: Micro-Affirmations and Campus Climate
Posted by On Wednesday, July 16, 2014

While studying how to improve workplace conditions for under-represented groups, MIT ombudsman Mary Rowe discovered the pernicious effect on morale and performance of small acts of disrespect, which “seemed to corrode some professional relationships like bits of sand and ice.” She called these events, “micro-inequities.” They often arose around issues related to sex, gender identity, race, sexual orientation, gender expression, and national origin — “wherever people are perceived to be ‘different’.”

Rowe’s concept of “micro-inequities” is akin to “micro-aggressions,” an idea that has gained considerable coverage in the media recently (for instance, here, here, here, here, and here).  Schools trying to create safe and supportive campus environments for their students should take this idea seriously and consider ways to address these small poisonous acts.

Awareness is one possible approach. Professor Derald W. Sue, one of the foremost researchers on micro-aggressions, speaks about the importance of encouraging students to reflect critically on their own worldviews and to “become increasingly aware of the worldviews of people who differ from them.” Including discussion of micro-aggressions in bystander training could also help discourage these behaviors. Not only would this increase awareness about the issue, but it would help students gain the confidence and skills to speak up when they or a friend was in some way disparaged. Indeed, Rowe writes that “it it is not just inappropriate remarks by individuals that sting, but the silence of a wide array of bystanders.”

Micro-Affirmations and Bystander Training

Rowe observed, however, that micro-inequities were often committed unconsciously or automatically, making it hard for individuals to catch and correct their problem behaviors, and making awareness a more elusive educational goal.

(more…)

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Free Bystander Workshop
Posted by On Tuesday, April 8, 2014

As part of Sexual Assault Awareness Month, we’re releasing materials and resources that we think can help schools build their prevention programming. Today we’re publishing a workshop on Bystander Intervention. It includes a power point, handout, assessment, and discussion guide.

Download the materials here:

  1. Bystander Intervention PPT TAI
  2. Bystander Intervention Discussion Guide
  3. Bystander Intervention Handout
  4. Bystander Intervention Assessment
  5. Bystander Intervention Assessment Answer Key

In addition to our online courses, which discuss safe and positive options for bystander intervention, we also offer this workshop to help schools conduct live training. Resources like these can play an important role in your ongoing prevention efforts. You can use our reports to identify audiences that might most benefit from further bystander education or you can use the training as part of regular and optional workshops.

According to the Campus SaVE Act’s draft regulations, bystander training plays an important part in any school’s primary prevention programming. As defined in the draft regulations:

The term bystander intervention refers to safe and positive options that may be carried out by an individual or individuals to prevent harm or intervene in situations of potential harm when there is a risk of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking against a person other than the individual. Effective bystander intervention training prepares participants to recognize situations of potential harm, overcome barriers to intervening, identify safe and effective intervention options, and take action.

We will be releasing more materials this month and next. We hope you find them helpful!

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