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Free Webinar: Preventing Sexual Violence on Campus with Michelle Issadore
Posted by On Thursday, April 23, 2015

Next week, on Wednesday, April 29, we will host our second free webinar. Michelle Issadore, M.Ed., will talk about strategies “Preventing Sexual Violence on Campus.” You can register now to reserve your place.

Issadore is the Executive Director of the School and College Organization for Prevention Educators (SCOPE). She works with schools, colleges, and community organizations nationwide to assess and improve their strategic prevention efforts, as well as research and understand best practice initiatives.

Issadore’s presentation is a timely reminder of the fast approaching July 1st deadline when the Campus SaVE Act regulations take effect. The Campus SaVE Act requires colleges and universities to offer student and employee education programs “to prevent dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking.”  (You can find our full breakdown of the Campus SaVE Act requirements on our blog.) This webinar will helps schools put together their prevention programs for the 2015-2016 academic year. Register for the free webinar now to reserve your place.

For many colleges and universities, implementing prevention programs seems like a daunting task, especially given the complexity of the issues and the need to coordinate and engage various stakeholders. Indeed, one of our takeaways from the NASPA conference this year was the need to bring together different prevention efforts and initiatives on campus. Similarly, last year, the Centers for Disease Control published its brief, “Connecting the Dots,” on the links between different forms of violence in order to help schools “coordinate and integrate responses to violence in a way that recognizes these connections.”

Our discussion next week will help address these pressing concerns for schools considering how to train a diverse audience on a breadth of issues around sexual and gender-based violence. During our 45-minute webinar, Michelle Issadore will answer questions surrounding sexual assault prevention strategies on campus and what institutions can do to overcome challenges associated with implementing widespread initiatives.

Michelle Issadore will specifically address the following questions:

  • What are some ways schools can achieve a community-level approach?
  • How can departments work together to create consistent messaging?
  • What role does compliance now play in prevention programming?

Even if your institution currently has training solutions in place, Michelle’s experience and expertise will prove invaluable to anyone looking to enhance their efforts.

Register for the free webinar now to reserve your place .

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Free Webinar with Dr. Novak
Posted by On Monday, March 16, 2015

Peter NovakTomorrow, we will be hosting a free webinar with Dr. Peter Novak, the Vice Provost for Student Life at the University of San Francisco. If you haven’t already done so be sure to register today.

During this 45-minute webinar, Dr. Novak will answer questions about how he and USF built and deployed their NASPA Gold Excellence award-winning Campus SaVE Act Training Program for students, faculty, and staff, and overcame challenges associated with deploying the campus-wide initiative.

Dr. Novak has an extensive background in Student Life with considerable experience as an academic and administrator in social justice issues. He received his doctorate in Dramaturgy and Dramatic Criticism from Yale University. In addition to his doctorate, he holds an MFA from the American Conservatory Theater and an MA in English from Loyola University Chicago.

At Yale Dr. Novak served as Dean of Trumbull College , on the Provost’s Committee on Resources for Students and Employees with Disabilities, and on the Fund for Lesbian and Gay Studies. He is also a founding chair and tenured full professor in the Performing Arts and Social Justice program at the University of San Francisco. His research focuses on diversity and language, LGBTQ and HIV/AIDS dramatic literature, and Deaf culture and American Sign Language translation.

In December 2011, dissatisfied with the online training USF was offering incoming students, Dr. Novak approached LawRoom to build Think About It, an online training program for incoming students that addressed campus sexual assault and substance abuse. Dr. Novak had been impressed by the quality of LawRoom’s online harassment training programs developed for faculty and staff, and he felt LawRoom would be a valuable partner in creating a cutting edge, engaging online program on substance abuse and sexual violence for incoming students.

The collaboration brought together LawRoom’s expertise in legal compliance and online training with USF’s experience handling the unique social challenges students face in their transition to college life. As a result of their work, LawRoom developed CampusClarity, a service of LawRoom that is dedicated to creating training solutions for the higher education community.

USF and CampusClarity worked together extensively in the creation of the course. They conducted focus groups and user panels with students to refine the voice and tone of the course and make sure scenarios reflected realistic situations. Additionally, numerous department representatives and programs at USF, including the Gender and Sexualities Center and Health Promotions, helped develop learning objectives and course content. During the development process, USF and CampusClarity also hosted a conference with faculty and staff from 30 universities in order to prepare the course for a diverse group of campuses.

Since the development of Think About It, USF and CampusClarity have continued to collaborate on other initiatives and projects, such as the Talk About It community, a collection of resources administrators can use to implement ongoing programming on their campuses around the issues of sexual violence and alcohol abuse.

Tomorrow, Dr. Novak will talk in more detail about other initiatives he’s implemented at USF. Among other things, he will talk about balancing training with other priorities in Student life and how to create an effective program with limited staff, limited time, and limited budget.

His talk will be valuable for schools looking for ways to improve their current programs, and for schools that are just developing their training programs.

Dr. Novak will also discuss practical solutions for going beyond SaVE Act compliance, including:

- Deploying a campus-wide training program prior to the June deadline.
- How to help ensure adoption of the program by students and faculty.
- On-going educational programming based on institutional data.

Please go to our registration page to sign up for our free webinar if you haven’t already.

 

 

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Free Infographic on Stalking
Posted by On Thursday, January 22, 2015

What is StalkingJanuary is National Stalking Awareness Month, an event especially relevant to college campuses, since, according to a recent study, college students are more likely to experience stalking than the general public. The study was done by the Crime Victims’ Institute at Sam Houston State University. Researchers drew on data from the 2006 National Crime Victimization Survey Stalking Victimization Supplement.  They discovered that only 2.2% of the general public experienced stalking in the past year compared to 4.3% of college students. Furthermore, while college students were more likely to acknowledge that what they experienced was stalking, they were less likely to report it to the police.

To help spread awareness and promote safety on your campus, download and share this infographic with key information about who is at risk for stalking and what to do if you are being stalked.

 

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Free Party Smart Poster
Posted by On Wednesday, December 10, 2014

Party Smart GuideFinals are here. As students gear up for their end of term exams, they may also be planning to party down when they’re done. And other students may be looking forward to a last hurrah this weekend before finals officially start.

This Party Smart poster, based on Think About It and developed at the University of San Francisco by Jennifer Waryas, provides a convenient resource to help students make safe decisions about drinking.

The “Safe Party Guide” offers students tips for before, during, and after a party. It covers everything from setting a limit to using the buddy system, giving students a checklist to follow before they go out. It is perfect for dorm hallways, bulletin boards, or bathrooms.

Download the poster by visiting our Talk About It Community page.

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Free Workshops for Employees on Discrimination and Harassment
Posted by On Thursday, October 30, 2014

silhouette of woman looking at flowersAlthough recent focus has been on training students, it is critical that colleges and universities also train faculty and staff on issues related to sexual harassment and discrimination. After all, faculty and staff play an important role in creating a supportive campus where everyone feels safe and respected. These short workshops provide you with two valuable resources to educate faculty and staff. The first is directed to all staff while the second addresses the role and responsibilities of supervisors. The workshops were developed by Kent Mannis, our Senior Editor.

The Anti-Harassment interactive lecture and discussion guide will reinforce your schools’ commitment to preventing workplace sexual harassment. By examining a purported “office romance” scenario, employees will review the legal standards for a “hostile work environment,” the school’s restrictions (if any) on personal relationships, and your anti-harassment reporting policy and procedures. This workshop is appropriate for all staff.

The Supervisors’ Role in Preventing Harassment interactive lecture and discussion guide will reinforce your school’s policy against harassment and discrimination, and help supervisors understand their responsibility to avoid, prevent, and respond to harassment and discrimination. By reviewing real-world scenarios, supervisors will understand the importance of taking prompt action to prevent misconduct, what to do if trouble occurs, and the consequences of inaction.

To download the workshops visit our Talk About It Community.

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Ten Free Resources on Bystander Intervention
Posted by On Wednesday, October 8, 2014

Bystander Intervention has received a lot of attention from educators and advocates in the last few years. The most recent guidance from the Department of Education about Title IX recommends that schools provide training to students on “strategies and skills for bystanders to intervene to prevent possible sexual violence.” The White House’s first report on campus sexual violence pointed to bystander intervention as a “promising prevention strategy” that schools should be implementing on their campuses.

Fortunately, there are already numerous resources available to schools to begin developing their own bystander training. Alongside the White House’s report, the CDC released a document outlining what’s involved in building a bystander program. It provides a great starting point. Below are some more resources you can use to educate trainers about how to teach bystander intervention as well as videos and other materials you can use in workshops with students.

Dr. Alan Berkowitz — Bystander Intervention

This series of short videos by renowned consultant on social justice issues Alan Berkowitz provides a good resource for staff and faculty who are preparing bystander workshops or materials. Berkowitz tells stories of intervention and the principles they illustrate.

Dr. Mary C. Gentile — Giving Voice to Your Values

Mary Gentile teaches ethical decision-making and values-driven leadership for business schools. Although these topics might seem a far cry from sexual violence, they’re not. Her book and workshops focus on teaching students how to speak up and step in when they see something wrong. At the center of her approach is the idea that most ethics education focuses too much on recognizing ethical dilemmas and debating the nuances of them as opposed to responding to ethical dilemmas. Her book and website are full of resources that could be adapted to bystander training for students, staff, and faculty around issues of sexual violence.

Who Are You — Bystander Intervention Video

This video went viral last year. From a New Zealand multi-media campaign aimed at stopping sexual violence, it illustrates all the different people who could have intervened in one evening to stop a sexual assault. The video could fit well into workshops about sexual violence, consent, and, of course, bystander intervention.

Prevent Connect Wiki

This website includes a 10 minute video on “Engaging Bystanders in Violence Against Women Prevention,” which can be a nice introduction for staff or administrators unfamiliar with the approach. The website also includes a good list of videos you can use to discuss bystander intervention strategies, including several clips from the ABC show “What Would You Do?” that involve bystander action around sexual harassment and potential sexual violence.

White House — It’s On Us Campaign

As part of its effort to curb sexual violence, the White House has started an awareness campaign to promote intervening behaviors. The website includes some good resources, including videos.

NSVRC — Bystander Intervention Resources

“This online resource collection offers advocates and preventionists information and resources on bystander intervention. It includes resources to use with community members, as well as information and research on the effectiveness of bystander intervention.”

MIT — Active Bystanders

A nice site with some advice on effective intervention strategies as well as a few interactive scenarios students or facilitators could use to practice bystander skills.

Step Up!

A comprehensive bystander intervention program, Step Up offers a lot of great free resources to help staff develop bystander programs on their campuses. It offers great guides on developing effective bystander scripts. One of the great things about Step Up is that they broaden intervention beyond sexual violence to include issues like drinking, anger, and academic honesty. It is another valuable resource for students and educators. In particular, check out their library of videos that you can use to facilitate discussions about how to intervene and barriers to intervention.

Dr. David Lisak

David Lisak’s homepage offers some valuable resources on understanding predators and the predatory nature of sexual violence.

Samantha Stendal and Aaron Blanton – “A Needed Response”

Created during the Steubenville rape trial by two University of Oregon students, this short, simple video conveys a powerful message about treating women with respect. The video was honored with a Peabody Award, the first viral video to receive that accolade.

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Five Online Resources about the Effects of Trauma on Survivors of Sexual Assault
Posted by On Thursday, September 4, 2014

Survivors don’t always act the way we expect. For example, they may exhibit a flat affect or have trouble remembering events. Some officials find these reactions suspicious and as a result question the credibility of the survivor’s account. But the survivor’s reactions may be the result of the trauma of a sexual assault.

Training your campus community on the effects of trauma can help dispel these misconceptions and create an environment that better supports victim/survivors. Indeed, the OCR’s Title IX FAQ emphasizes the need for schools to educate students and employees on the effects of trauma. The White House’s Not Alone report also highlights the need for better trauma-informed training.

Our courses cover the neurobiological effects of trauma on victim/survivors and we’ve also written about Dr. Rebecca Campbell’s research on this topic. But there are also some excellent, free, online resources that you can use as the school year begins to help inform staff, students, and faculty. Below we highlight a few:

  1. National Sexual Violence Resource Center — “The Brain, Body, and Trauma.”
  2. Dr. David Lisak — Neurobiology of Trauma
  3. Dr. Rebecca Campbell — Neurobiology of Sexual Assault (interview)
  4. Dr. Rebecca Campbell — Seminar on the Neurobiology of Sexual Assault
  5. International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) — Police Response to Violence Against Women

 

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Free Workshop on Consent
Posted by On Thursday, August 14, 2014

We’re excited to release today a consent workshop developed by our friends at the University of San Francisco’s Division of Student Life.

The workshop would be a helpful addition to any orientation program or a stand-alone refresher course for later in the year. It covers the definition of consent and gives some important statistics about sexual assault and intimacy in the campus community. It also gives students the opportunity to practice communication skills related to asking, giving, and denying consent.

Here are the downloads:

Although this workshop was developed for women, it can easily be adapted for students of any gender. In fact, we hope schools will tailor these resources to fit their unique needs and we encourage you to make refinements and improvements as you see fit. We do ask, however, that you share any changes you make to a workshop and make them freely available to the whole student conduct community (that’s why we use a creative commons license).

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Free Poster on the Campus SaVE Act
Posted by On Wednesday, August 6, 2014

Campus SaVE Act Any effort to eliminate campus sexual violence must involve creating and fostering a campus environment where survivors feel comfortable and confident reporting an incident. Unfortunately, according to the Campus Sexual Assault Study, only 5% of campus sexual assaults were reported to the police or campus security. Many students said that they weren’t sure how to report, didn’t want anyone to find out, or were worried that their complaint wouldn’t be taken seriously.

To create a supportive environment, the first step is to educate students, staff, and faculty about these issues and their respective roles and responsibilities — a fact recognized by recent proposed legislation andthe Campus SaVE Act enacted in 2013. Both require schools to educate students and employees on recognizing, reporting, and preventing sexual violence.

This poster helps promote awareness about the Campus SaVE Act and outlines what faculty, staff, and students need to know to fulfill their role in helping to create a safe campus community.

Download the poster here.

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2 Minutes Will Change How Your Students Think About Consent
Posted by On Tuesday, July 22, 2014

One of the most important things you can do to change the culture on your campus is to get students talking about consent. Today, we’re excited to publish a video that can do just that, from our award-winning online program Think About It:

Teaching students about consent is an important piece of any sexual violence prevention program.  Indeed, consent was at the center of the White House’s recent PSA announcement — “If she doesn’t consent – or can’t consent – it’s a crime” — and in California, the state legislature is debating proposed legislation that would require colleges to adopt a policy that defines consent to sexual activity as an affirmative, conscious, and voluntary agreement.

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