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Campus Climate Surveys: A tool for creating anti-racist policies and procedures
Posted by On Thursday, November 12, 2015

Articles in the Chronicle, Huffington Post, Washington Post, and many others have detailed racism at colleges and universities. Student Activism has put racial microaggressions, incidents of blatant racism, and institutionalized racism into the media and in many cases has already led to action by administration.

In 2013, the Black Student Union at the University of Michigan started the #BBUM, or Being Black at U of M, campaign to bring awareness to the experiences of students of color on campus. This campaign received national attention and coincided with a list of demands to administration for improving the campus climate for students of color, and specifically Black and African American students, on campus.

Similar events have taken place at the University of Missouri (Mizzou) and Yale and student solidarity seems to be spreading to campuses around the country. While the situations at Mizzou and Yale have played out differently, the student activists are responding to similar frustrations with ongoing racism that has been left unaddressed by the school. Students are getting fed up with their institutions claiming “diversity” and “inclusivity” when their lived experiences tell them otherwise. Students are getting fed up with leaders not taking racism on campus seriously. And students are getting fed up with acts of blatant racism receiving no repercussion.

What does campus racism have to do with the campus climate around sexual assault? A lot. Campus climate is holistic in that it defines how students experience their time at a school. However, it has many different facets. Lately, we have been focusing on campus climate and how it relates to sexual assault (including sexual violence, sexual misconduct, sexual harassment, and dating/relationship violence). The racial climate on campuses definitely plays into how students perceive the climate around sexual assault.

If a student does not feel included, safe, or welcomed on campus, if a student does not feel supported by administrators, if a student does not feel a sense of community, if a student does not see faces who look like them in positions that matter, if a student is struggling every day just to survive in a space that is stacked against them, what is to make them want to report? Or even if they want to, what is to make them feel safe reporting?

Similarly, if the perpetrator of an assault was a student of color, reporting can be an especially complicated decision. If reporting means giving another reason for people of color to look like criminals or perpetrators of violence, survivors might be hesitant to report due to the potential harm to their community – perhaps the only community they feel a part of on campus.

So what does all of this mean? Sexual assault education, response, and policies are not one-size-fits-all. A survivor-centered approach needs to take into consideration the unique experiences of each survivor, including how their culture, community, and identities intersect with that experience. The Department of Justice suggests that a “culturally relevant, survivor centered approach” needs to have the following components:

  • Is grounded in the experiences of all survivors on campus. This requires the campus to understand not only the dynamics of the crimes, but the nuances that each crime presents and how these crimes are experienced by diverse groups of survivors on campus.
  • Takes into account cultural contexts in order to better understand the survivor’s experience and how this may affect such actions like a survivor’s decision not to report or seek services.
  • Is flexible and adaptable to the needs of survivors so they are not re-traumatized by the campus’s efforts.
  • Prevents the creation of processes, protocols and systems that support institutional interests over survivor’s needs.

At the 2015 NASPA conference, a session titled “Considering Students of Color in Sexual Assault Prevention” by Luoluo Hong, Mark Houlemard, Ross Wantland, and Patricia Nguyen discussed using a social justice framework when thinking about sexual assault on college campuses. To do this, it is imperative that administrators recognize that racism and sexism are “interlocking systems of oppression” and doing anti-sexism work also means doing anti-racism work. One of my main takeaways from this session was when Hong suggested replacing the word “students” in your sexual assault policies with “students of color.” And then ask yourself: Does the policy still apply? Is it realistic and comprehensive? Are students of color actually considered in the voices of victims and perpetrators? Most importantly, how is your sexual assault prevention work anti-racist?

How does this relate to Climate Surveys? As we previously wrote, Sexual Assault Campus Climate Surveys are being considered a “best practice response to campus sexual assault.” One of the most beneficial usages for climate survey data is being able to sort and filter it based on demographics like class standing, gender, sexual orientation, and race. When you administer your campus climate survey, pay special attention to the perceptions and experiences of students of color. Compare the experiences of white students and students of color for questions about reporting sexual assaults, perceptions of campus safety, and bystander behaviors. Reporting numbers have been low across campuses (2-5%) when participants were asked if they reported the assault through official school systems. This data needs to be cross-tabulated with different demographics to isolate data about how race impacts perceptions and experiences with sexual assault. Climate surveys are a great tool to gauge racial disparities on your campus and can lead to creating policies and procedures that are anti-racist.

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Weekly Roundup
Posted by On Friday, May 16, 2014

Much of our coverage on this blog focuses on the latest and most innovative methods of preventing sexual assault and holding the perpetrators of assaults responsible for their crimes. This week, we’re bringing you stories of three unique, though in some cases controversial, techniques for fighting sexual assault on American campuses.

Alleged Perpetrators Named on Bathroom Walls

The first and probably most controversial story comes from Columbia University, where unknown activists have repeatedly published the names of alleged “Sexual assault violators on campus” and “Rapists on Campus” on fliers and bathroom walls. The frustration evidenced by such tactics may come as no surprise at a university where 23 students have filed a federal complaint regarding Columbia’s sexual assault policies. However, while some students have applauded the vigilante-like tactics, others have criticized such public shaming as being counterproductive to the goal of achieving changes in campus sexual assault policy.

Pop-up Ads Warn Prospective Students about Universities’ Sexual Assault Problems

Meanwhile, the women’s activist group UltraViolet has taken similar tactics online to publicly shame schools accused of Title IX violations.  UltraViolet’s online ads target high school students whose search terms, Facebook profiles, or physical location suggest that they might be interested in attending schools currently under federal investigation for having inadequate sexual assault policies. The ads ask if the user has been accepted to the university in question, and warn, “You should know about its rape problem before you attend.” According to InTheCapital, a similar campaign targeting Dartmouth last year reduced admissions by 14%. Naturally, such campaigns have created controversy, especially because not all of the schools targeted by UltraViolet are actually under federal investigation.

FundRazr Campaign Raises Funds for Sexual Assault Lawsuit

A student’s lawsuit against Yale University and its philosophy professor accused of sexual assault claims the university of “knowingly protecting him.” The lawsuit is getting a boost from an online fundraising campaign meant to raise funds to hire an expert witness for the unnamed plaintiff. The campaign (which has met its $7,000 goal) was supported by a number of noted philosophers, some of whom have referenced the numerous recent sexual assault scandals in their discipline when explaining their contributions.

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