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Hazing

Weekly Roundup
Posted by On Friday, March 21, 2014

For the last several weeks we’ve been covering an ongoing national conversation about the dangers and advantages of Greek organizations on college campuses. This week, three stories illustrate the fact that the problems and dilemmas posed by Greek fraternities are not unique to that particular brand of student groups, or even the United States.

Black Fraternities’ Hazing Problem

Most of that ongoing national conversation has focused on fraternities that are largely white, heterosexual, and, naturally, entirely male. But of course there are sororities, as well as black, Asian, Latin, and various professional fraternities and sororities. These groups often face different problems than those faced by predominantly white fraternities, but that doesn’t mean that they are problem free, or should be ignored in a conversation about the dilemmas posed by student groups. A good example is provided by this story about hazing and black fraternities—since the beginning of 2014, more than 17 members of black fraternities at three different universities have been arrested for hazing.

Student Co-op’s Drug Problem

Nor are problems like substance abuse limited to student groups with the word “fraternity” or “sorority” at the end of their name. Take, for example, the latest bit of drama coming from U.C. Berkeley, this time out of its student cooperative system, the largest in the country. Cloyne Court, which is itself the largest housing co-operative in the country, recently settled a lawsuit brought by the family of resident John Gibson, who has been in a drug-induced coma since he overdosed while living at Cloyne in 2010. Faced with “unaffordably high” insurance rates, Berkeley Student Cooperative president said, “We need to make a direct response to this settlement to show our efforts to prevent further incidences and liability. A change needs to happen now.” Radical changes to address what they see as a culture of substance abuse at Cloyne, include evicting all but one of the co-op’s current residents, and rebranding it as an academic-themed, substance-free residence.

Portugal’s Hazing Problem

The drowning deaths of six Portuguese university students in a single hazing (or praxes) incident, has sparked a national debate in that country about whether or not the tradition of hazing first-year students should be banned. Unlike in this country, hazing in Portugal is not associated with student groups, but is instead a general rite of initiation for incoming students, demonstrating that the inclination towards reckless behavior amongst young people is one that cannot be solved simply by targeting specific, or even all, student groups.

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Weekly Roundup
Posted by On Friday, March 14, 2014

A national fraternity is making big changes, while college presidents don’t think they have to. It’s this week’s Weekly Roundup!

College Presidents Agree Colleges Have a Sexual Assault Problem—Just Not Their College

Much of this blog is dedicated to the epidemic of sexual assaults afflicting college campuses. Much of that coverage has focused on schools’ all-too-often inadequate responses to allegations of sexual assault. Now, a new study suggests that college presidents are aware of at least part of the problem—71% of college presidents agree that institutions of higher education need to improve their response to sexual assault. Which institutions exactly need to clean up their act is unclear however, as 95% of those presidents surveyed asserted that their schools “handle sexual assault allegations appropriately.”

New Lawsuit Challenges the Campus SaVE Act

One possible solution to the issues 95% of college president’s don’t think their institutions have is the Campus SaVE Act, which lays forth at least some guidelines for how schools deal with and attempt to prevent sexual assault. However, a lawsuit filed earlier this month asks a federal court to stop application of Campus SaVE Act provisions in all campus disciplinary proceedings, as well as a pending federal investigation of the University of Virginia’s mishandling of a sexual assault case.  The lawsuit contends that the Campus SaVE Act, which took effect last October, is one step forward, two steps back for victims of sexual assault because it “eliminat[es] the preponderance standard set forth three years ago by the DOE. It also removes the time limit for colleges to resolve sexual assault cases.” They want the court to resolve any conflicts between the Title IX guidelines in the 2011 Dear Colleague Letter and the Campus SaVE Act.

However, U.S. Senator Robert Casey, the senator who originally drafted the Campus SaVE Act, says the Campus SaVE Act was not intended to supersede Title IX requirements in the DCL. Casey told the Rulemaking Committee currently drafting the implementing regulations that, “institutions will still be subject to Title IX obligations … to use the ‘preponderance of evidence’ standard,” as well as the requirement that proceedings be “prompt and equitable.”

SAE Fraternity Ends Hazing Nationwide

In the past few weeks we’ve included stories about the pros and cons of the impact Greek organizations have on campuses and student life. Now, it seems that at least one Greek organization—the fraternity Sigma Alpha Epsilon—has been listening to their critics. Their national office announced this week that, following a number of deaths linked to hazing and substance abuse, they would end hazing at their chapters nationwide.

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