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Campus SaVE Compliance: Continuing, On-Going Education & Prevention
Posted by On Tuesday, October 20, 2015

You administered Think About It on your campus… now what?  The Campus SaVE Act requires schools provide “primary prevention and awareness programs” for new students and employees, as well as ongoing education, which refers to campaigns that are sustained over time, occur at different levels, utilize a wide range of strategies, have appropriate content for the audience, and provide ways for individuals to get involved.

Think About It, our flagship course, and its follow-ups, Part II and Part III, and the future release of Think About It: Continuing Students provide schools with options for ongoing education. However, there are many complimentary things that you can be doing on your campus throughout the school year! They fall into three categories of prevention and education. The different categories of prevention originated out of the health field with a focus on disease and illness. The goal of preventative actions is to stop further progression of the condition. In this case, the condition is sexual violence and the goal is for prevention efforts to stop 100% of sexual violence incidents before they occur. Unfortunately, this is not the reality of the work, and so there are other forms of programming, resourcing, and education that can supplement prevention. For our purposes, we have added a fourth and fifth category to the type of work happening on campus to remediate the impacts of sexual violence. We categorize these as Risk Reduction and Awareness Education.

Primary Prevention: Efforts that address sexual violence before it happens

Secondary Prevention: Efforts that deal with immediate effects of sexual violence

Tertiary Prevention: Efforts that manage long-term effects of sexual violence

Risk Reduction: Efforts that give potential victims tools that could minimize risk of sexual violence

  • Personal safety apps (Livesafe, Companion)
  • Responsible partying tips
  • Bystander Intervention
  • Self-defense classes

Awareness Education: Efforts that build awareness of the sexual violence among the target population (These can often fall into the categories of secondary or tertiary prevention, but it is important to remember that on its own, awareness is not preventative)

Your on-campus and online efforts to eliminate the incidences and impacts of sexual violence have the ability to make culture change far beyond that of just your campus. College age men and women are at the highest risk for sexual assault, but that doesn’t mean the problems stop when they leave campus. The education and programming they receive during their years in college will impact them long after they leave, creating a healthier and safer world for us all to live in. CampusClarity is intentional about including components of each type of prevention and education in Think About It to best arm campuses with the tools needed to make lasting change.

  • Primary Prevention: Think About It uses social norming by asking students “insights” questions that gauge their perspective and then tell them how their peers responded. Often students think that their beliefs make them outliers, when really most of their peers have the same concern as well as the same belief.
  • Secondary Prevention: Throughout Think About It, there are links to hotlines like RAINN (Rape, Abuse, and Incest National Network) and allow for administrators to include on-campus and off-campus resources for students to counseling centers, hospitals, or other crisis interventions.
  • Tertiary Prevention: Think About It can be used as a tool to educate peers about how to best assist those who are struggling with abusive relationships, have experienced sexual assault, or overuse alcohol/drugs.
  • Risk Reduction: In Think About It, there is a focus on bystander intervention to encourage friends and peers to intervene in situations of risk. We also provide tips on partying safer. By acknowledging that students will still engage in these activities, we give them the resources needed to do it in the least risky way.
  • Awareness Education: When campuses use Think About It, they also gain access to Talk About It, our online resources that include posters and white papers about topics like sexual assault, dating violence, and alcohol use. We also link to reporting policies so that students gain the knowledge needed to report sexual violence or misconduct.

While CampusClarity provides as many resources as possible, we are definitely not able to do this alone. It is important that campuses also enlist the help of our partners in this fight to end sexual/dating violence. Check out the links above for some options.

Is there programming on your campus that you’re especially proud of? We’d love to hear your success stories at our Annual Summit this March. Please email talkaboutit@campusclarity.com for more information.

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Campus Climate Surveys: Data Collection as Prevention & Risk-Reduction
Posted by On Wednesday, October 14, 2015

Sexual Assault Campus Climate Surveys are a hot topic for student affairs administrators around the country. Some schools have administered internal climate surveys, some have utilized prepared climate surveys from the AAU or HEDS, and others are in the process of developing and implementing climate surveys. While climate surveys are not yet federally required (although some states are now mandating them and the OCR has required them of schools under investigation), the government has urged schools to adequately assess the climate on their campuses through climate surveys.

At CampusClarity, we do more than just help reach Title IX & Campus SaVE compliance. We strive to eliminate sexual and dating violence on college campuses and beyond. Because climate surveys are considered a best practice for gauging campus climate, we have developed a tool that will help campus administrators tackle the huge task of building climate surveys.

Over the past few months, our product development team has dedicated countless hours to learning from others, developing best practices, and engineering a platform that will allow administrators to simply and swiftly build campus climate surveys. Our platform has many unique features made specifically for campus climate surveys, such as built in content/trigger warnings, a landing page for IRB approval, and default settings that will help increase completion rates. Perhaps most useful is that all data collected will go into the same LMS with data from Think About It and our other courses. Data can be cross tabulated by demographic, and will be delivered with sample size protection as to not out students with underrepresented identities.

We partnered with Callisto, a sexual assault reporting tool for colleges, to host a webinar revealing our climate survey platform. Callisto allows schools to collect data all year round about incidence and prevalence of sexual assault. When partnered with climate surveys, Callisto can provide administrators the information they need to provide prevention, risk reduction, and awareness education on campus. View the below webinar to learn more about climate survey best practices, Callisto, and CampusClarity’s new product.

Climate Survey Webinar

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Weekly Roundup
Posted by On Friday, August 7, 2015

In this week’s roundup —  the Department of Justice launches a new website to help schools prevent sexual violence, Netflix makes a big announcement that may have impact other employers, and an interview with a professor who studies how roommates influence each other.

DOJ Launches Website

The U.S. Department of Justice Office on Violence Against Women launched its new website changingourcampus.org, which Principal Deputy Director Bea Hanson of the OVW said provides “access to cutting-edge tools, including sample policies, protocols, and best practices, that can be adapted and replicated on colleges and universities across the country.” Here’s a sample of what you’ll find:

  • Links to U.S. Department of Education guidance documents, OCR Title IX Resolutions, the VAWA regulations, and FERPA information in one place
  • Links to national resources, recent research and publications on preventing and responding to sexual violence
  • Online prevention efforts and ideas, including CampusClarity
  • Resources for stakeholders, including links to helpful information for organizing and maintaining an effective conduct and disciplinary process
  • Links to Victim Services/Advocates, including a U.S. Department of Health and Human Services resource that helps find health care and mental health facilities in your community

Netflix Offers Unlimited Maternal/Paternal Leave

In a momentous move by Netflix, the world’s leading internet subscription service for watching movies and television shows, the company has decided to change its maternity/paternity leave policies. Effective immediately, new moms and dads, from either childbirth or adoption, will have the ability to take as much paid time off as needed within the first year of parenthood. The press release goes on to state that, “We want employees to have the flexibility and confidence to balance the needs of their growing families without worrying about work or finances. Parents can return part-time, full-time, or return and then go back out as needed.”  This is an especially impressive move due to the current federal regulations around maternity leave.  The Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993 only mandates that new mothers (who work in a company of 50+ people, have worked there for 12 months, and have worked at least 1,250 hours over the last year) receive a minimum of 12 weeks of unpaid leave.  With the current state of maternity/paternity leave being abysmal, Netflix is trailblazing an employee-centered approach that allows for empowerment and self-accountability.  The Netflix Chief Talent Officer, Tawni Cranz, believes that this will lead to increased focus and dedication of employees.

How Colleges Assign Roommates, and Why It Matters [Gated]

As students start arriving on campuses across the country, many will be meeting the people they will be living with for the next year — for the first time. In this article, The Chronicle‘s Beckie Supiano interviews Bruce Sacerdote, who studies the effects roommates have on each other. Professor Sacerdote claims that more and more schools are randomly assigning roommates to each other. This trend is a good thing, he thinks. Randomization, according Sacerdote, “stimulates cross-geographic, cross-race, cross-cultural interaction.” Basically, Sacerdote’s research indicates that roommates have little effect on GPA, but do affect students’ drinking and social behavior. Interestingly, Professor Sacerdote also claims roommates influence job choice: “so if you happen to get someone who’s interested in finance, it makes you significantly more likely to pursue that both in internships and as a career.” No matter how your campus assigns roommates, the friendships and acquaintances your first-years make this fall will impact them for the rest of their lives.

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Free Checklist on SaVE Act Compliance
Posted by On Friday, February 13, 2015

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The Campus SaVE Act requires colleges and universities that participate in federal student aid programs to offer “primary prevention and awareness programs” to all incoming students and new employees to “promote the awareness of rape, acquaintance rape, domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking.”

The Campus SaVE Act details a wide range of information that must be covered in a school’s prevention program. This flyer provides a convenient checklist for the Campus SaVE Act requirements, and can help you decide if our courses could help you fulfill those requirements.

Final regulations implementing the Campus SaVE Act take effect on July 1, 2015, so it is important you and your campus are prepared. Get the checklist here.

 

 

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Free Infographic on Stalking
Posted by On Thursday, January 22, 2015

What is StalkingJanuary is National Stalking Awareness Month, an event especially relevant to college campuses, since, according to a recent study, college students are more likely to experience stalking than the general public. The study was done by the Crime Victims’ Institute at Sam Houston State University. Researchers drew on data from the 2006 National Crime Victimization Survey Stalking Victimization Supplement.  They discovered that only 2.2% of the general public experienced stalking in the past year compared to 4.3% of college students. Furthermore, while college students were more likely to acknowledge that what they experienced was stalking, they were less likely to report it to the police.

To help spread awareness and promote safety on your campus, download and share this infographic with key information about who is at risk for stalking and what to do if you are being stalked.

 

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Free Party Smart Poster
Posted by On Wednesday, December 10, 2014

Party Smart GuideFinals are here. As students gear up for their end of term exams, they may also be planning to party down when they’re done. And other students may be looking forward to a last hurrah this weekend before finals officially start.

This Party Smart poster, based on Think About It and developed at the University of San Francisco by Jennifer Waryas, provides a convenient resource to help students make safe decisions about drinking.

The “Safe Party Guide” offers students tips for before, during, and after a party. It covers everything from setting a limit to using the buddy system, giving students a checklist to follow before they go out. It is perfect for dorm hallways, bulletin boards, or bathrooms.

Download the poster by visiting our Talk About It Community page.

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Free Workshops for Employees on Discrimination and Harassment
Posted by On Thursday, October 30, 2014

silhouette of woman looking at flowersAlthough recent focus has been on training students, it is critical that colleges and universities also train faculty and staff on issues related to sexual harassment and discrimination. After all, faculty and staff play an important role in creating a supportive campus where everyone feels safe and respected. These short workshops provide you with two valuable resources to educate faculty and staff. The first is directed to all staff while the second addresses the role and responsibilities of supervisors. The workshops were developed by Kent Mannis, our Senior Editor.

The Anti-Harassment interactive lecture and discussion guide will reinforce your schools’ commitment to preventing workplace sexual harassment. By examining a purported “office romance” scenario, employees will review the legal standards for a “hostile work environment,” the school’s restrictions (if any) on personal relationships, and your anti-harassment reporting policy and procedures. This workshop is appropriate for all staff.

The Supervisors’ Role in Preventing Harassment interactive lecture and discussion guide will reinforce your school’s policy against harassment and discrimination, and help supervisors understand their responsibility to avoid, prevent, and respond to harassment and discrimination. By reviewing real-world scenarios, supervisors will understand the importance of taking prompt action to prevent misconduct, what to do if trouble occurs, and the consequences of inaction.

To download the workshops visit our Talk About It Community.

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Ten Free Resources on Bystander Intervention
Posted by On Wednesday, October 8, 2014

Bystander Intervention has received a lot of attention from educators and advocates in the last few years. The most recent guidance from the Department of Education about Title IX recommends that schools provide training to students on “strategies and skills for bystanders to intervene to prevent possible sexual violence.” The White House’s first report on campus sexual violence pointed to bystander intervention as a “promising prevention strategy” that schools should be implementing on their campuses.

Fortunately, there are already numerous resources available to schools to begin developing their own bystander training. Alongside the White House’s report, the CDC released a document outlining what’s involved in building a bystander program. It provides a great starting point. Below are some more resources you can use to educate trainers about how to teach bystander intervention as well as videos and other materials you can use in workshops with students.

Dr. Alan Berkowitz — Bystander Intervention

This series of short videos by renowned consultant on social justice issues Alan Berkowitz provides a good resource for staff and faculty who are preparing bystander workshops or materials. Berkowitz tells stories of intervention and the principles they illustrate.

Dr. Mary C. Gentile — Giving Voice to Your Values

Mary Gentile teaches ethical decision-making and values-driven leadership for business schools. Although these topics might seem a far cry from sexual violence, they’re not. Her book and workshops focus on teaching students how to speak up and step in when they see something wrong. At the center of her approach is the idea that most ethics education focuses too much on recognizing ethical dilemmas and debating the nuances of them as opposed to responding to ethical dilemmas. Her book and website are full of resources that could be adapted to bystander training for students, staff, and faculty around issues of sexual violence.

Who Are You — Bystander Intervention Video

This video went viral last year. From a New Zealand multi-media campaign aimed at stopping sexual violence, it illustrates all the different people who could have intervened in one evening to stop a sexual assault. The video could fit well into workshops about sexual violence, consent, and, of course, bystander intervention.

Prevent Connect Wiki

This website includes a 10 minute video on “Engaging Bystanders in Violence Against Women Prevention,” which can be a nice introduction for staff or administrators unfamiliar with the approach. The website also includes a good list of videos you can use to discuss bystander intervention strategies, including several clips from the ABC show “What Would You Do?” that involve bystander action around sexual harassment and potential sexual violence.

White House — It’s On Us Campaign

As part of its effort to curb sexual violence, the White House has started an awareness campaign to promote intervening behaviors. The website includes some good resources, including videos.

NSVRC — Bystander Intervention Resources

“This online resource collection offers advocates and preventionists information and resources on bystander intervention. It includes resources to use with community members, as well as information and research on the effectiveness of bystander intervention.”

MIT — Active Bystanders

A nice site with some advice on effective intervention strategies as well as a few interactive scenarios students or facilitators could use to practice bystander skills.

Step Up!

A comprehensive bystander intervention program, Step Up offers a lot of great free resources to help staff develop bystander programs on their campuses. It offers great guides on developing effective bystander scripts. One of the great things about Step Up is that they broaden intervention beyond sexual violence to include issues like drinking, anger, and academic honesty. It is another valuable resource for students and educators. In particular, check out their library of videos that you can use to facilitate discussions about how to intervene and barriers to intervention.

Dr. David Lisak

David Lisak’s homepage offers some valuable resources on understanding predators and the predatory nature of sexual violence.

Samantha Stendal and Aaron Blanton – “A Needed Response”

Created during the Steubenville rape trial by two University of Oregon students, this short, simple video conveys a powerful message about treating women with respect. The video was honored with a Peabody Award, the first viral video to receive that accolade.

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Five Online Resources about the Effects of Trauma on Survivors of Sexual Assault
Posted by On Thursday, September 4, 2014

Survivors don’t always act the way we expect. For example, they may exhibit a flat affect or have trouble remembering events. Some officials find these reactions suspicious and as a result question the credibility of the survivor’s account. But the survivor’s reactions may be the result of the trauma of a sexual assault.

Training your campus community on the effects of trauma can help dispel these misconceptions and create an environment that better supports victim/survivors. Indeed, the OCR’s Title IX FAQ emphasizes the need for schools to educate students and employees on the effects of trauma. The White House’s Not Alone report also highlights the need for better trauma-informed training.

Our courses cover the neurobiological effects of trauma on victim/survivors and we’ve also written about Dr. Rebecca Campbell’s research on this topic. But there are also some excellent, free, online resources that you can use as the school year begins to help inform staff, students, and faculty. Below we highlight a few:

  1. National Sexual Violence Resource Center — “The Brain, Body, and Trauma.”
  2. Dr. David Lisak — Neurobiology of Trauma
  3. Dr. Rebecca Campbell — Neurobiology of Sexual Assault (interview)
  4. Dr. Rebecca Campbell — Seminar on the Neurobiology of Sexual Assault
  5. International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) — Police Response to Violence Against Women

 

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Free Workshop on Consent
Posted by On Thursday, August 14, 2014

We’re excited to release today a consent workshop developed by our friends at the University of San Francisco’s Division of Student Life.

The workshop would be a helpful addition to any orientation program or a stand-alone refresher course for later in the year. It covers the definition of consent and gives some important statistics about sexual assault and intimacy in the campus community. It also gives students the opportunity to practice communication skills related to asking, giving, and denying consent.

Here are the downloads:

Although this workshop was developed for women, it can easily be adapted for students of any gender. In fact, we hope schools will tailor these resources to fit their unique needs and we encourage you to make refinements and improvements as you see fit. We do ask, however, that you share any changes you make to a workshop and make them freely available to the whole student conduct community (that’s why we use a creative commons license).

(more…)

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