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Accessible e-Learning: Developing WCAG2.0 Compliant Courses

Posted by On Thursday, October 29, 2015

Education about sexual violence, alcohol and other drugs, and healthy relationships is an important part of creating safe and healthy college campuses. Some schools have chosen to develop in-person training for this education, whereas others have chosen to use e-courses like CampusClarity’s Think About It. No matter what the method of delivery, it is important that all students, regardless of ability, have access to this vital information.

Accessibility for prevention programs is not specifically addressed by VAWA or the Campus SaVE Act. However, the Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights enforces accessibility compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act for public and private colleges and universities.

Accessibility standards are evolving to keep pace with emerging technologies. The Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0, developed through the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), are currently the favored standard. All of CampusClarity’s online student trainings meet WCAG 2.0 Level AA specifications.

What does this mean?

The main principles of WCAG 2.0 are Perceivable, Operable, Understandable, and Robust. There are specific guidelines that exist within each of these principles to ensure that accessibility is more than just about the text on screen but also about the experience of the user.

There are three levels of conformance. Level AA is the intermediate level of specifications, which deals with the biggest and most common barriers for disabled users. Level AA is the standard the government is using as a benchmark for accessibility.

What does CampusClarity actually do to ensure accessibility?

Here are some examples of ways that we are maintaining our Level AA compliance with the WCAG 2.0;

  • Always provide text alternatives for non-text content (1.1.1)
  • Provide captions for videos and animations (1.2.2, 1.2.4)
  • Present content in a logical order to enable index ordered tabbing through the course (1.3.1)
  • Maintain contrast ratio minimums to ensure sufficient contrast (1.4.3)
  • Provide a “skip to content” links throughout the courses (2.4.1)
  • Offers different ways to navigate between pages (2.4.5)
  • Always provide clear headers for tabular data,  and descriptive labels for all content (2.4.6)

Our courses are all built using an in-house tool that enforces compliance of accessibility standards as part of course design.  For CampusClarity, accessibility is not an afterthought but is core to our whole system of course development. Accessibility is an ongoing concern and implementation of best standards and practices is a continuing process. If there is ever a concern with accessibility in one of our courses, we would love to hear from you!

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